Viewing: eudaimonia

Transcending Dichotomies: Freedom in Community and the Poet Philosopher

Part of my college essays series: This is one of the essays I wrote during the political theory general exam for my PhD. The exam was an approximately 15-hour marathon session, involving 6 out of 12 essay questions, for a final total of 33 double-spaced pages written without access to any notes or sources. In this […] Read More

Published: “Immanent Politics, Participatory Democracy, and the Pursuit of Eudaimonia”

I just had an article published in Libertarian Papers: “Immanent Politics, Participatory Democracy, and the Pursuit of Eudaimonia,” Libertarian Papers 3, 16 (2011). Here’s the abstract: This paper builds on the burgeoning tradition of Aristotelian liberalism. It identifies and critiques a fundamental inequality inherent in the nature of the state and, in particular, the liberal […] Read More

Ancient vs. Modern Political Thought

First installment in my new college essays series: This is one of the essays I wrote during the political theory general exam for my PhD. The exam was an approximately 15-hour marathon session, involving 6 out of 12 essay questions, for a final total of 33 double-spaced pages written without access to any notes or […] Read More

Progressive Egalitarians Should Be Anti-IP

The Obama Administration insists that “‘Piracy is flat, unadulterated theft,’ and it should be dealt with accordingly.” Nonsense, of course. Only scarce goods can be property and therefore only scarce goods can be stolen. Ideas or information patterns are nonscarce goods. If I take your bicycle, you don’t have it anymore. If I copy your […] Read More

Voting, Moral Hazard, and Like Buttons

I was reading Sarah Lacy’s “If You’ve Got Social Media Fatigue, UR DOIN IT WRONG” on TechCrunch and was reminded of a passage from Henry David Thoreau’s seminal essay “Civil Disobedience” that I discuss in chapter 6 of my dissertation. First the passage from Lacy’s article: Sometimes metrics can be a bad thing and beware of […] Read More

Oughtism and Its Cure

I decided to rename my blog “Is-Ought GAP: The Cure for Oughtism,” simultaneously turning separate eristic jokes by Stephan Kinsella and another libertarian on their heads. ((No public links are available for the two jokes. Sorry.)) Stephan, who believes the alleged is-ought gap is unbridgeable, jokingly suggested I title my blog “Is-Ought GAP” during an […] Read More